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Expanded STD Package

This package is recommended by our physicians to screen for the 6 most common STDs: HIV, Herpes (HSV1 & HSV2), Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis, and Hepatitis (A, B & C). A free physician consultation is included with this test if the results are positive for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, or HSV2. It will be up to the physicians discretion if a prescription will be provided. Results may take 3 to 4 business days once the specimen is received at the laboratory.

Expanded STD Package

$795$198

This package is recommended by our physicians to screen for the 6 most common STDs: HIV, Herpes (HSV1 & HSV2), Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis, and Hepatitis (A, B & C). A free physician consultation is included with this test if the results are positive for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, or HSV2. It will be up to the physicians discretion if a prescription will be provided. Results may take 3 to 4 business days once the specimen is received at the laboratory.

  • Chlamydia & Gonorrhea  This urine test for the bacteria that causes chlamydia & gonorrhea detects infection within 1 to 5 days of exposure.
  • HIV  Detects antibodies and antigens created by your immune system to help diagnose HIV.
  • Syphilis  Detects antibodies that the body develops in response to the infection that causes syphilis.
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen  Detects antigens to hepatitis B to screen for active infection.
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibodies, Total  Core antibodies are the first antibodies produced by the body in response to infection with hepatitis B. A positive core antibody result could indicate either previous or ongoing infection.1
  • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Types 1 & 2  Detects antibodies the body produces in response to herpes.
  • Hepatitis C Virus HCV Antibody  Measures the level of hepatitis C antibodies to screen for infection with hepatitis C virus.
  • Hepatitis A Antibody, IgM  This test measures the level of Hepatitis IgM antibodies in the blood.

What's it used for?

Sexually transmitted diseases are infections that can be contracted from an infected person through sexual contact. Such diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or yeast. There are numerous kinds of STD’s that affect both men and women. Despite their prevalence in both genders, women normally face more drastic consequences arising from such infections. The expanded STD package tests for 9 of these sexual infections. HIV (antibodies and antigens): the human immunodeficiency virus, otherwise known as HIV, is the cause of AIDS. When a person contracts HIV, it is normally because he got exposed to the blood or body fluids of an infected person. Sometimes, a contaminated needle could lead to exposure. HIV is a virus that triggers an attack on the person ‘s immune system. With time, this virus can destroy a large number of these cells, leading to a weakened immune system. As a result, the body’s T-cells will be reduced significantly; and, the body will no longer be able to fight off infections and diseases. That’s when opportunistic infections and cancers start taking advantage of the body. Till now, there is no effective cure for this virus. However, an early detection and a proper medical care can control this viral infection. Containing the virus will prevent its progress to AIDS. There are three stages for HIV. The first stage occurs two to four weeks after being infected: that’s when the person will start experiencing flu like symptoms which could last a couple of weeks. The second stage is called a clinical latency. This is an asymptomatic period when the virus is still active but reproduces at very low levels. People who are diagnosed with HIV aim at remaining within this stage. Proper medication is needed to accomplish this. The third stage is the last stage and that’s when the HIV virus turns into AIDS. This HIV test measures antibodies and antigens. When the virus enters the body, HIV antibodies are produced as a result of antigens. This is how the body begins its attack against the virus. HIV antigens are proteins found the core structure of the HIV. The presence of this protein indicates infection. Antigens are normally present in the body before even the building up of antibodies. Herpes 1 & 2: herpes is a very common infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. This latter is found in two types: type-1 and type-2. Both are highly contagious and can be passed from a person to another by having contact with an infected person’s sores. Sometimes, asymptomatic individuals can also pass the herpes virus to their partners. Type-1 herpes is referred to as oral herpes. It leads to the formation or sores and blisters around the mouth. Type-2 herpes is referred to as genital herpes and consists of the same lesions as type-1, but developing around the genital area. The herpes virus is an infection that remains in the person’s system. When a person gets infected, painful blisters develop at the site of infection in about two weeks post-infection. It takes up to four weeks for these to heal. In some instances, the first episode of this virus is accompanied by flu-like symptoms and swollen glands. In others, symptoms may be unnoticeable. When the first outbreak gets resolved, the virus becomes latent/dormant in the system. The infected person will experience a re-activated herpes virus when he or she are undergoing some stress or a certain illness. Individuals who have HIV/AIDS or have gone an organ transplant may witness a more severe outbreak of the herpes virus. This test looks for antibodies for both types of herpes. This blood test checks for the presence of the antibodies as a result of being exposed to the virus. Chlamydia: It is a very common sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria called chlamydia trachomatis. It is an infection that can be easily treated once detected. Chlamydia can lead to many health complications such as being prone to other sexually transmitted infections such as gonorrhea and HIV, developing pelvic inflammatory disease which is the infection of the uterus and fallopian tubes, developing epididymitis, prostate gland infection, or reactive arthritis. It might even lead to infertility through scarring and obstructing fallopian tubes in women. This test can screen for and diagnostic chlamydia infections. Since most infected people do not develop symptoms, most health organizations recommend getting tested routinely. This test detects the presence of this bacterium in your urine anywhere between one to six days post-exposure. Gonorrhea: it is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This bacterium tends to infect anything that is moist in our body including the urethra, eyes, throat, vagina, anus, fallopian tubes, cervix, and uterus. You can contract gonorrhea by having unprotected sexual contact with an infected person, whether it is anal, oral or vaginal sex. While symptoms maybe barely noticeable, those who do experience them start showing signs within two to fourteen days post exposure. If you are infected and do not show any symptoms, you are a non-symptomatic carrier and can be highly contagious. It may take several weeks for men to show symptoms. These include a burning and painful sensation during urination, a high frequency and urgency of urination, having a pus-like discharge from the penis that may be swelling and red, having a persistent sore throat, and even having swelling or pain and the testicles. This condition is highly treatable; but, can lead to organ damage is if left untreated. Women, on the other side may witness some discharge from the vagina, sore throat, fever, sharp pain in the lower abdomen, having heavier periods, and having the frequent urgency to urinate that may be accompanied by pain and burning sensations. This test detects the presence of this bacterium in your urine one to six days after being infected. Syphilis: it is sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Individuals tend to spread this infection by sexual contact, when getting into contact with a syphilis sore, also referred to as a chancre. It is an easy treated infection, that may lead to severe health problems if left untreated. There are three stages of the syphilis infection. The primary syphilis begins about two to three weeks after being exposed. This is when the chancres begin to appear on the infected body part. If it appears in the rectum or cervix, it may not be noticeable. It usually takes four to six weeks for it to disappear regardless of whether the infected person was treated or not. Secondary syphilis happens if the primary syphilis was left untreated. It usually happens six weeks to six months after the chancre first appeared. It is usually marked by a skin rash that appears on the palms of the hands and the bottoms of the feet. This trash is not itchy; and, it may be accompanied by other symptoms such as fever, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat and body aches. Tertiary syphilis is the latent stage of this infection. The stage can last for many years and end up having the bacteria causing damage is in the body such as neurosyphilis, heart diseases, mental illness, neurological problems, blindness and even death. This test can detect the antibodies that the body developed as a response of the infection. Hepatitis A (Antibodies IgM): Hepatitis A in a Vvral infection creating endemics around the globe. This infection is highly contagious and affects the liver leading to its inflammation. You can get infected by getting in close contact with an infected person, among others. When a person gets exposed to the virus, the immune system begins producing antibodies IgM. It takes the body anywhere between two to three weeks after exposure to the virus to have detectable antibodies. a hepatitis A infection may take up to six months to clear from the system. This test helps detect the IgM antibodies for Hepatitis A. Hepatitis B (Surface antigens & Core antibodies total): it is an infection caused by the hepatitis B virus and affecting, seriously, the liver. The majority of adults who contract hepatitis B recover from it no matter how severe the symptoms were. Some people end up having the hepatitis b infection lasting more than six months. This is referred to as chronic hepatitis B. it increases the risk for developing liver failure, liver cancer and liver cirrhosis. Hepatitis B can be easily prevented through vaccination. The hepatitis B virus has proteins on its surface called antigens. Once the virus is contracted, the body identifies these antigens and develop their antibodies as defensive measure. Several weeks post exposure, the blood of an infected individual can start showing the hepatitis B surface antigen. Hepatitis C (antibodies): hepatitis C is an infection caused by a virus: the hepatitis C virus (HCV), and causing the inflammation of the liver. This type of hepatitis is more severe than the other two as there is no vaccination for it and its spread could lead to damaging side effects. According to Mayo Clinic, this hepatitis is now curable by the administration of oral medication on a daily basis and over a period stretched over six months. When the virus enters the body, our immune system forms and releases antibodies to fight it off. This test detects antibodies against the HCV. Why take the Expanded STD Package? With many sexually transmitted infections out there, it is necessary to get tested early. Pregnant women who contract an STD can have serious health problems for their fetus. While antibiotics are normally given to STDs caused by bacteria, yeast or parasites, these do not have any effect on viruses who are often managed by a special type of treatment. If an STD is left untreated, it could lead to numerous health problems such as infertility, cancer, blindness and organ damage. The CDC explainsthat more than 20 million new sexually transmitted infections happen every year, in the USA. The HIV antibodies and antigens test are needed to determine is you are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Herpes 1 & 2: this test is needed to screen and diagnose a herpes simplex virus infection. Those who might have been infected with this virus, need to get tested. Also, a pregnant woman who might be infected puts her newborn at high risk of developing congenital herpes, which is a serious medical condition. Congenital herpes might lead to brain damage, blindness and the death or the newborn baby. When left undiagnosed and untreated, herpes can lead to many discomforts. But, most importantly, this virus can be devastating especially for individuals with weakened immune systems. Chlamydia: this test can help screen for and diagnose a chlamydia infection. If you have signs and symptoms this bacteria infection, you need to get tested. symptoms include having painful urination, having lower abdominal pain, witnessing vaginal discharges for women and penis discharges for men, feeling pain during sexual intercourse and women and testicular pain for men, and finally having bleeding between periods or after sexual intercourse. Chlamydia can also infect the rectum leading to rectal pain, discharge and bleeding. Women who are sexually active and younger than twenty five years old need to be screened routinely. Pregnant women also need to be screened for chlamydia during the first trimester of their pregnancy. The test will have to be repeated three months after completing for treatment for positive results. Men who have sex with men are at high risk of contracting chlamydia. The CDC recommends they get tested annually. If your sexual partner has been diagnosed with chlamydia, you have to get tested. Gonorrhea: this test is used to screen for and diagnose a gonorrhea infection. It can also help assess the effectiveness of the given treatment. if you think you got exposed to this bacterium, you need to get tested and receive the proper treatment course. Also, sexually active men and women who are at higher risk of being infected need to get tested routinely. Those who had previous gonorrhea infections or other sexually transmitted diseases, need to be tested routinely. Reinfection is highly probable. Syphilis: this test helps diagnose and screen for an infection with a bacterium called Treponema pallidum that leads to Syphilis. You need to take this blood test to identify the presence of the syphilis antibodies as a result of an infection. It is also a great indicator of the effectiveness of the treatment chosen. If you have signs and symptoms, you need to get tested. Those who are at high risk of being infected with syphilis need to get tested like: being treated for another STD, being pregnant, being a man who is having sex with a man, having unprotected sex with multiple partners, having an HIV infection, or having your partner diagnosed with Syphilis. Hepatitis A (Hepatitis A Antibodies, IgM): this test can detect and screen for a hepatitis A infection as early as two weeks after exposure. It also helps assess the need to have a hepatitis A vaccine as a prevention measure. For some adults and children, this type of hepatitis may not show any signs or symptoms. In others, symptoms that are flu-like can start appearing like fever, fatigue, diarrhea, loss of appetite, nausea, and jaundice. Hepatitis B (Surface antigens & Core antibodies total): this test can help a current or previous hepatitis B infection. It can also be a great tool to monitor and guide a given treatment. if you think you have symptoms of hepatitis B, you need to get tested. Signs include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, having dark urine or pale stools, feeling joints pains, and jaundice. For those at high-risk for a hepatitis B infection, a surface antigen may be needed to do the screening. Hepatitis C (Antibodies): this test can help screen for and diagnose a hepatitis C viral infection. It can also help monitor the chosen treatment and assess its effectiveness. If you have some symptoms of this viral infection, you need to get tested. Such signs include having pain in the right upper abdomen, having abdominal swelling due to fluids, noticing dark urine or lightly-colored stools, feeling tired, developing a fever, as well as jaundice. People who are at high-risk for contracting hepatitis C include: drug users (injection through needles who might share their needles with infected individuals), having long-term kidney diseases, being born to a mom who is infected, receiving an organ that is infected, engaging in unprotected sexual contact with an infected person, getting a tattoo with an infected needle, or working around infected blood (health care workers). If you think you might have been exposed to any of the above-mentioned STDs, you need to get tested. Also, if you think you are at high risk of getting infected, you need to routine check for these infections. People at high risk for contracting an STD need to get tested, regularly. While sexually transmitted infections can affect anyone, regardless of the age, gender, race or sexual orientation; certain behaviors may put the person at higher risk of being infected. For example, having unprotected anal, vaginal or oral sex can increase the likelihood of contracting an STD. Other risk factors include being younger than 25 years, having multiple partners, being gay or bisexual, injecting drugs, drinking alcohol, selling sex for money, having other STDs, and being in a relationship with someone who lives in an area prevalent in STDs. What could affect results and lead to false negative? Getting tested too early can lead to false negative. A false positive result happens when an infected person gets tested and end up having a negative result. False positive results are a big problem as they lead to the progression of the disease without seeking the proper treatment. For every infection, there is an incubation period needed to show the right results. Once testing for sexually transmitted diseases, you need to make sure that you are not testing too early after exposure. Most medical organizations agree that there are no medications, supplements or food choices that may negatively impact the results of this expanded STD package. What your Expanded STD results mean? HIV (antibodies and antigens): if the test for antigens and/or antibodies gave a negative result, this normally indicates that the person is not infected with HIV. This means that up till the time the test was taken, the virus is not existing. If you think you tested negative but are still suspicious, you may want to repeat the test. If your tested positive for HIV; then, you are infected with the virus. In that case, you have to seek immediate medical care to start planning your treatment plan. The CDC has a new recommendation when it comes to HIV testing. According to them, you need to screen for HIV by using a double test (antibodies and antigen). If the test gave positive results; then, it is recommended to verify the findings with a second antibody test. This will help identify the virus as HIV-1 or HIV-2. If both tests are positive; then, you are infected. If both tests gave different results; then, you will have to do an HIV-RNA test. A positive result on this latter indicates infection with the virus. Herpes 1 and Herpes 2: a positive herpes simplex test, for either types, indicates the presence of an active or recent infection. Negative HSV antibodies test indicated that it is unlikely for the individual to have an active herpes infection. So, a positive herpes type-1 antibodies result indicates an active herpes type-1 infection. A positive herpes type-2 antibodies test indicates an active herpes type-2 infection. A negative test results for both indicates the absence of both viruses in the system. Chlamydia: a positive test indicates the presence of the chlamydia bacteria. In that case of course of antibiotics would be needed. A negative test indicates that there is no evidence of the infection at the time of the test. If you are involved in high risk behaviors, you need to be tested regularly. Even if your test gave negative results, it is highly probable to get infected after doing this test, especially among teenagers. The test is also a great indicator for the effectiveness of the course of treatment chosen. Once treated, you need to retake the test after three months to make sure you are cured. Gonorrhea: a positive test indicates an active gonorrhea infection that requires the proper course of antibiotics. A negative test means that, up till the day you got tested, there’s no evidence of infection. Syphilis: a negative antibody test means that you are not infected with this bacterium. However, you need to keep in mind that being negative does not mean that you are protected. A positive result means that you do have the treponemal antibody and have an active syphilis infection. If the test is being used to assess the treatment success, the antibodies levels need to be lower in the second test. Hepatitis A (Hepatitis A Antibodies, IgM): a positive hepatitis A antibodies (IgM) indicates an active infection with the Hepatitis A virus. A positive test can also indicate a previous infection that is marked by a prolonged presence of the antibodies. A negative result indicates either the absence of the virus in the system or the absence of its immunity too. Hepatitis B (Surface antigens & Core antibodies total): a positive result indicates an acute, chronic or past/resolved hepatitis B infection. A negative test means that you do not have and never had an acute infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. Hepatitis C (Antibodies): a negative test means that you do not have the virus, but it could also means that you might have been infected recently. In that case, you need a second test. A positive test result means that you have an active hepatitis C infection. It could also mean that you might have had the viral infection at some point in your life. In that case, further tests are needed. Commonly Asked Questions If I get an STD, and get treated, can I get it again? While some STDs can be cured when detected early and treated correctly, it is very likely to get re-infected if you get exposed to the infection again. Infected individuals need to make sure their partners are not infected too. In that case, both partners need to be screened for and treated properly. Also, high risk behaviors need to be stopped to prevent a second infection of the same STD or a new one. Is oral sex risky? Oral sex is when you use the mouth, lips or tongue to stimulate the penis, vagina or anus of a sex partner. The CDC explains that eighty five percent of sexually active adults between the ages of eighteen and forty-four years, have oral sex at least one time with their partner. It is a commonly practiced sexual activity that can happen between heterosexual as well as same sex couples. Many sexually transmitted diseases can still be spread through oral sexual contact. Anyone performing oral sex on an infected partner can get an STD in their mouth and throat. Anyone infected who is performing oral sex can spread STD’s to other’s genitals or rectum. What STDs can be spread orally? Many factors are involved in the risk of getting an STD from oral sex or spreading it to others. The risk itself depends on the type of the sexually transmitted disease, sex act that is practiced, how common is the STD in the population of the partner, and the number if sex acts performed. Numerous infections can be sexually transmitted orally. Chlamydia, for example, can be spread by giving oral sex to a man or woman with an infected penis, vagina, or urinary tract. Also, you can get chlamydia and your throat by giving oral sex to a man or woman well then infected rectum. From another angle getting oral sex on the penis, vagina or anus infected person who has chlamydia in the throat, can spread infection to your genitals, urinary tract and rectum. The same transmission routes apply to other orally transmitted STDs such as gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, and HIV. What is riskier: oral, anal or vaginal sex? While oral sex can spread many STDs, somehow impossible to compare the exact risks from each type of sexual activity. This is mainly due to the fact that most people who have oral sex end up having vaginal or anal sex. Very few studies looked at these risks. The CDC explains that a few studies have shown the risk of getting HIV from oral sex to be lower than getting it anally or vaginally from an infected person. Also, may be possible that having chlamydia and gonorrhea infections in the throat may cause an easier spread of these infections to others. One may also need to add the fact that treating gonorrhea in the throat can be harder then treating it in the genitals, UTI or rectum. What increases your risks of passing an infection orally? Some factors may increase the risk of getting sexually transmitted diseases during oral sex with an infective partner. These include having poor oral health and hygiene such as tooth decay, gum disease, bleeding gums and even oral cancer. Having sores in the mouth or on the genitals can also increase the likelihood of spreading sexually transmitted diseases through oral sex. Finally, being exposed to the pre-cum or the cum of an infected partner can increase the risks. How can you prevent orally transmitted STD’s? STDs can be passed on from an infected person to his or her sexual partner, even if no signs and symptoms are showing. Many, who are infected with an STD, are not aware of it. They increase the risk of spreading the infection to others. There are many preventive measures necessary to prevent sexually transmitted diseases from spreading. Using a condom, dental dam or other barriers, every time you have oral sex, can make a big difference. Remember that the most effective way to prevent sexual transmitted diseases is by abstinence. It is also important to keep in mind that many infected individuals do not know they are infected; and, are not showing any symptoms. Getting tested regularly for STDs is necessary for sexually active individuals. If you think you got exposed to any type of sexual transmitted disease, get tested immediately. Can the HIV antibody test be used to detect HIV in newborns? No, as the mother’s antibodies are normally transferred to the newborn. They stay in the baby’s system for up to one year. If you want to check whether your newborn is HIV positive, you need to order the HIV RNA test. If you test positive on the HIV test, is it confidential? Just like for any other health condition, your HIV status is protected by the HIPAA Privacy Rule. So, your friends, family, and employer will not be notified of anything. Your results may only be shared with your healthcare giver who needs to treat you. And, just for statistical analysis, all new cases have to be reported to state and local departments of health. Can I keep my test results to myself? Yes, you can, but it is not advised. It is recommended that you tell your healthcare professional (doctor) about any positive STD result in order to plan a proper treatment plan. Sexually transmitted diseases can lead to many serious and life-threatening conditions. You need to seek proper care; and, as soon as possible. Also, it is recommended to share with your partner if you tested positive for any STD. How can I treat HIV/AIDS? There is no cure for HIV or AIDS. There is a treatment plan consisting of antiretroviral pills that can improve the infected person’s immune system. This treatment can help an infected person live longer than be healthier. The treatment normally includes three types of drugs belonging to two types, which will prevent the virus from replicating and avoid drug-resistant strains. Can herpes be prevented? Oral herpes cannot be prevented. You’re exposed to it during your everyday life. Some may even be exposed to it during their childhood from a parent or a relative. However, genital herpes can be prevented by taking some precautions. Why abstaining from any sexual contact is the best way to prevent any sexually transmitted disease, being in a mutually monogamist relationship with an uninfected partner is important. Sexually active individuals need to correctly and consistently use condoms. Also, avoid having any sexual contact during an outbreak. How is Gonorrhea treated? The CDC recommends two types of antibiotics to address this bacterium: ceftriaxone and azithromycin. These two need to be taken simultaneously to minimize the risk of the bacteria becoming resistant to the treatment. Is having syphilis a problem during pregnancy? Yes. During pregnancy, having syphilis may lead to health problems for the infant such as low birth weight, premature delivery, and still birth. This is known as congenital syphilis. If left untreated, the newborn may develop cataracts, deafness or even seizures. According to the CDC, every pregnant woman has to be tested for syphilis during her first prenatal visit. If a woman is at high risk of being infected, she may have to be re-tested during the third trimester.  

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